Satanism: The Contra(ry)religion

In this long series of posts on Satanic religion as I see it, I’ve argued for Satanism as a kind of contrareligion (contrary religion?). Its principal aim: to unpack and dismantle sociologist Peter Berger’s “sacred canopy” and all similar neophobic, endocentric constructs of delayed-return worldview and religiosity.  I’ve argued that this essentially destructive enterprise is … Continue reading Satanism: The Contra(ry)religion

Animum nodis exsolvere: Unknotting the Mind and Freeing the Self from Self-Imposed Bonds, Part I

I ended the previous installment of this blog series on Satanism as religion with seventeenth-century English poet Robert Herrick’s memorable phrase “wild civility.” So let me pick right back up and open this belated fourth post on that same note. Wild Men in an Eastern Wilderness As an undergraduate at the University of Georgia, I … Continue reading Animum nodis exsolvere: Unknotting the Mind and Freeing the Self from Self-Imposed Bonds, Part I

Satanism, Epicureanism, and the Unbinding of Religio

The philosophical school founded in the late fourth century BCE by the iconoclastic empiricist Epicurus was quite unlike its other major Hellenistic rival, Stoicism, despite the fact that the two shared a commitment to a physical or materialist view of the world, even up to and including the human soul. The Stoics, however, argued that … Continue reading Satanism, Epicureanism, and the Unbinding of Religio

The Questionable Merit of Tying Knots: How Religio has Us All Bound Up in Them

In order to begin attempting the Gordian knot of how my conception of Satanism, so keen on unknotting many of the ties that bind our delayed-return societies together in impersonal and abusive dependencies, might nonetheless comprise a kind of religiosity, we must first visit the issue of how religion came conceptually to involve the tying … Continue reading The Questionable Merit of Tying Knots: How Religio has Us All Bound Up in Them

Make it New!

In a 1928 English translation of a Chinese Confucian classic, modernist poet Ezra Pound evinced what would become his characteristic injunction and the inspirational dictum of poetic modernism: “Make it new.” Some 2,228 or so years earlier, the Hellenistic poet Callimachus, scholar in the Ptolemaic institution that was the Library at Alexandria, Egypt, reported in … Continue reading Make it New!

You Don’t “Lose” Virginity, You Gain Experience…and Pleasure, if done right

A good long while ago, I read author Peggy Orenstein’s wonderful book Girls and Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape all about the weird hangups and pathologies surrounding female sexuality from which we suffer signally in this country. An important moment in the book for me came when the author was discussing the concept of … Continue reading You Don’t “Lose” Virginity, You Gain Experience…and Pleasure, if done right