On Externalization and the Theistic/Atheistic Divide within Satanism

Recently, the blog of a French colleague dropped The Devil’s Fane’s name as an example of the atheistic path within a modern religion characterized at least since 1975 by a presumptive split between those who view Satan as primarily symbol/inspiration/metaphor and those who imbue the figure with a more concrete external reality. I have little … Continue reading On Externalization and the Theistic/Atheistic Divide within Satanism

Externalization, Satanic Uniqueness, and the Theistic/Atheistic Debate

I haven’t discussed the ideas contained in this essay much on the site mainly because I was saving them for what has turned out to be one of the several books I’m supposedly working on writing (but shhh!—I shouldn’t discuss that goal publicly, for reasons that will become apparent at the end). However, I feel … Continue reading Externalization, Satanic Uniqueness, and the Theistic/Atheistic Debate

Is Satan Real?

I suppose the answer to this question depends on what you mean by “real.” Most folks intend that designation for things that have their own, unique physical existence in the external world. So what you really might be wondering is whether or not Satan exists as an external being or entity somewhere “out there” in … Continue reading Is Satan Real?

Satanism: The Contra(ry)religion

In this long series of posts on Satanic religion as I see it, I’ve argued for Satanism as a kind of contrareligion (contrary religion?). Its principal aim: to unpack and dismantle sociologist Peter Berger’s “sacred canopy” and all similar neophobic, endocentric constructs of delayed-return worldview and religiosity.  I’ve argued that this essentially destructive enterprise is … Continue reading Satanism: The Contra(ry)religion

Immediate-Returnism and Delayed-Returnism as Exocentricity and Endocentricity, Respectively

In a missive addressed to John Adams on August 15, 1820, a seventy-seven-year-old Thomas Jefferson responds to a “puzzling letter” he had received from the elder Adams the previous May dealing with weighty philosophical and spiritual topics like “matter, spirit, motion etc.”  In answer to his correspondent’s complex “croud of scepticisms [sic]” which proved so … Continue reading Immediate-Returnism and Delayed-Returnism as Exocentricity and Endocentricity, Respectively

Animum nodis exsolvere: Unknotting the Mind and Freeing the Self from Self-Imposed Bonds, Part II, On Novelty, Fear, Death, & Wonder

In his 2014 book Nature’s God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic that I wrote about last time, author Matthew Stewart is keen to trace a latter-day Epicureanism that he argues provided “heretical origins” to our own nation’s struggle for independence. He follows this tenuous thread as it weaves in and out of European … Continue reading Animum nodis exsolvere: Unknotting the Mind and Freeing the Self from Self-Imposed Bonds, Part II, On Novelty, Fear, Death, & Wonder

Animum nodis exsolvere: Unknotting the Mind and Freeing the Self from Self-Imposed Bonds, Part I

I ended the previous installment of this blog series on Satanism as religion with seventeenth-century English poet Robert Herrick’s memorable phrase “wild civility.” So let me pick right back up and open this belated fourth post on that same note. Wild Men in an Eastern Wilderness As an undergraduate at the University of Georgia, I … Continue reading Animum nodis exsolvere: Unknotting the Mind and Freeing the Self from Self-Imposed Bonds, Part I

The Questionable Merit of Tying Knots: How Religio has Us All Bound Up in Them

In order to begin attempting the Gordian knot of how my conception of Satanism, so keen on unknotting many of the ties that bind our delayed-return societies together in impersonal and abusive dependencies, might nonetheless comprise a kind of religiosity, we must first visit the issue of how religion came conceptually to involve the tying … Continue reading The Questionable Merit of Tying Knots: How Religio has Us All Bound Up in Them

Make it New!

In a 1928 English translation of a Chinese Confucian classic, modernist poet Ezra Pound evinced what would become his characteristic injunction and the inspirational dictum of poetic modernism: “Make it new.” Some 2,228 or so years earlier, the Hellenistic poet Callimachus, scholar in the Ptolemaic institution that was the Library at Alexandria, Egypt, reported in … Continue reading Make it New!